The 4 Best Saltwater Fishing Lures for Fishing Panama’s Tuna Coast

Cedar Plug

Made from lead and cedar wood, many professional anglers who the fish tuna coast swear by this simple lure. First, the line is run down the center and then attached to the hook, which extends up into the lure. Although it is a simple design, this is one of the most successful lures around. Many anglers like to attach multiple cedar plugs in a daisy chain. As the lure bobs up and down in an irresistible jiggling motion, the tuna can’t help but bite. Cedar plugs are offered in a rainbow of color designs, but most people wanting to fish the tuna coast prefer the simple, unpainted variety.

Salas Jig

On the West Coast, anglers refer to metal jigs as “slinging iron”, using the lures to catch everything from barracuda, albacore, sea bass, and marlin to tuna. The first iron jig ever invented was called the Salas jig. First invented in the 1950s by the renowned Salas fishing family, today’s Salas Jigs are no longer made out of iron. Modern Salas Jigs are constructed from different metals, each one custom-designed for density and weight. At the bantam level of the scale is the Light 7X, which swims enticingly on the surface of the water. Heavier Salas Jigs include the 6X and 7X, which are more suitable for deep sea fishing in Panama Tuna Coast. Coming in a riot of colors and designs, including the famous Senorita and Nacho models, the Salas Jig is perfect for catching fish off the Tuna coast of Panama.

Rapala Magnum

In the early 1930s, a savvy Finnish angler named Lauri Rapala began studying how schools of fish move through the water, and discovered that game fish were more attracted to bait fish that swam in a slightly irregular motion. After taking this knowledge home and designing hundreds of lures, he perfected the Rapala Magnum. Shaped like a minnow, the Rapala Magnum is now available in both freshwater and saltwater versions. While competitors now offer plastic versions, experienced anglers who love to fish Panama prefer only Rapala Magnums made from wood.

Diamond Jig

In 1929, an avid fisherman named John Schumke decided to fashion a four-sided metal lure. Banking on his experience working for the Bridgeport Silvercare Company, this dazzling lure was originally known as the Bridgeport Diamond Jig. By 1955, the popularity of this lure grew so much that Schumke sold the rights to the Bead Tackle Company. Today, all Diamond Jigs are still manufactured in New England, and are some of the highest quality lures available on the market. Anyone interested in fishing the Tuna Coast should expect great success when employing the Diamond Jig, as these fish find the sparkling lure enticing.